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The Lakers are supporting Slava Medvedenko as he fights for Ukraine

Once a memorable role player on title-winning Lakers teams, Slava Medvedenko’s life after the NBA has taken a dramatic turn in recent months as he fights for his home country of Ukraine.

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Stanislav Medvedenko #14

Before the Lakers had a Robert Sacre or an Adam Morrison, there was Slava Medvedenko. A bit-part role player in the early 2000s, Medvedenko earned a pair of rings in his seven NBA seasons, spending six with the Lakers.

He only had one season in which he averaged more than 11 minutes per game, the same season he also nearly doubled his scoring output as he averaged 8.3 points in 21.2 minutes per game in 2003-04. That season, though, accounted for well over one-third of his points and minutes of his career, as he was often a backseat figure for the purple and gold.

Still, like those that came after him, Medvedenko became a fan favorite to point back and ask “remember him?” as the years have gone by.

However, in those years that have passed since he last played in 2007 — and specifically in the last handful of months — Medvedenko’s life has taken a drastic twist. Born in Ukraine, Medvedenko’s life, like so many others, was flipped on its head when Russia invaded the country earlier this year. But rather than seek refuge, Medvedenko stayed in Ukraine, Kyiv specifically, to defend his country.

Recently, Bill Oram of The Athletic caught up with Medvedenko for a truly great profile on what he is doing now, which included a quote from Lakers owner Jeanie Buss and her lack of surprise at Medvedenko’s heroic decision.

Lakers owner Jeanie Buss called Medvedenko, who never averaged more than 8.3 points in a season, “an ultimate role player.” That was something she thought of as she learned that he had not fled Kyiv, but instead took up arms to defend his country.

“You say, ‘OK, that matches the character of who that person is,’” she said. “And playing basketball isn’t life and death, but it is a reflection of who we are and what we bring.”

And on top of literal on-the-ground support of Ukraine, Medvedenko has also sought out just about any way possible to help financially support his country.

Given his stature as a former Laker, that has included auctioning off all sorts of memorabilia, including his championship rings from the 2000-01 and 2001-02 seasons. And in a gesture of support, the Lakers have stepped in to not only help provide supplies for a basketball camp Medvedenko plans to run for children affected by the war, but to replace his rings should he sell them.

Medvedenko is doing everything he can to support the Ukrainian army, which for a former NBA star has included auctioning off virtually all memorabilia from his playing days. He said he has already sold T-shirts, jerseys and sneakers. Next up: His championship rings, a process for which he has sought assistance from the Lakers.

The organization has offered to help however it can, including preparing a shipment of sports gear to send to Ukraine. In an email, Lakers executive Linda Rambis told Medvedenko that if he sold his rings, the team would replace them.

“I’m proud that we’re an organization that our former players know when they need help that somebody will answer their call,” Buss said.

It’s hard to fathom what Medvedenko and those in Ukraine are going through. The profile — which is really a must-read — details missiles routinely flying over his apartment, and Medvedenko’s courage in facing these moments head-on is admirable. And the Lakers stepping up to aid him in a number of ways is terrific to see as well.

So, here’s to Medvedenko staying safe amid those unfathomable circumstances, and to the Lakers and all others for helping him and the country out.

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