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Explaining Anthony Davis’ right achilles tendinosis and treatment options

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I broke down most recent lower body issue Anthony Davis is dealing with, and how the Lakers can help manage it.

Detroit Pistons v Los Angeles Lakers

Lakers big man Anthony Davis has been listed as questionable for the team’s Monday game against the Oklahoma City Thunder with “right Achilles tendinosis” (Update: He will officially miss the game. Original story follows).

It’s the first time that condition has been listed on his injury report. According to the latest report from Dave McMenamin of ESPN, testing on his Achilles (thankfully) came back clean.

A league source told ESPN it is “very likely” Davis will miss the Thunder game as a precaution and that Davis, 27, has been managing the discomfort “for a while.”

Davis underwent medical imaging on the injury, the source said, which assured the Achilles tendon is in good shape. However, the nine-year veteran has been experiencing tightness in his right leg, causing concern.

Still, this joins a long list of other lower body injuries that Davis has been listed with this season, including a right ankle contusion, right ankle sprain, lower back tightness, right adductor strain, right calf contusion, right knee contusion, right quad contusion and right Achilles tendinosis.

And if you’re wondering what achilles tendinosis actually is, and how the team will manage it, you aren’t alone. My Twitter mentions were filled with other Lakers fans also curious, and so I broke down what it is and how the team could handle it in my latest video to give everyone a better understanding of this condition:

Thanks for watching, and if you have any more questions, hit me up on Twitter at @3cbPerformance or let me know in the comments below.

Dr. Rajpal Brar has a doctorate in physical therapy from Northern Arizona University, and runs his own sports medicine and performance business, 3CB Performance, in West LA and Valencia, CA. He also works at a hospital — giving him experience with patients in the immediate healthcare setting and neurological patients (post stroke, post brain injury) — and has been practicing for 1.5 years. Brar is additionally training at UCLA’s mindful awareness research center (MARC), and analyzes the Lakers from a medical perspective for Silver Screen and Roll and Laker Film Room.