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The Lakers are Dodgers fans too

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One of us. One of us. One of us.

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Los Angeles Lakers Night at Dodger Stadium Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images

At long last, Los Angeles is the city of champions once again. On Tuesday, just 16 days after the Lakers were crowned champions of the NBA, the Dodgers won their first World Series since 1988. Coincidentally, the Lakers won a championship that year too.

However, it’s not just the history that the Lakers and Dodgers have made together that binds them: they’re two of the most storied teams in Los Angeles and it’s clear they have mutual respect for each other. In fact, it’s probably safe to say the Lakers are Dodgers fans at this point.

Following the Dodgers’ 3-1 win over the Tampa Bay Rays on Tuesday, the reigning NBA champions took to Twitter to celebrate their fellow champions — you know, just champ things.

Even the legends of Lakers past showed their support for the Dodgers. Magic Johnson, James Worthy and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, all of whom were part of the 1988 championship team, sent congratulatory tweets to the Dodgers. Johnson has been a part-owner of the Dodgers since 2012 and, in case you were wondering, his baseball tweets are as good as his basketball tweets.

A few of the Lakers went beyond just a congratulatory tweet to the Dodgers organization, though. James, Johnson and Kuzma all shouted out Clayton Kershaw, who finally won his first World Series after years of postseason heartbreak. Kershaw was drafted by the Dodgers with the No. 7 overall pick in the 2006 MLB Draft.

Mookie Betts also got a few shout outs after he led the Dodgers to a World Series just a few months after they traded for him. Sound familiar? It should.

But as nice as celebrating on social media is, it’s clear the Lakers want to do more than just tweet, with the exception of maybe Johnson, who left his last job so he could tweet more.

Unfortunately for everyone involved, there won’t be a parade (at least not a traditional one) for a little while because of the lingering threat of the coronavirus in the United States. That doesn’t mean we can’t still celebrate this moment in time; we just have to celebrate it a little differently and cautiously than we normally would.

And who knows? If we all do our part by wearing a mask and socially distancing, maybe there will be a parade sooner rather than later.

For more Lakers talk, subscribe to the Silver Screen and Roll podcast feed on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or Google Podcasts. You can follow this author on Twitter at @RadRivas.